Visual Identity

The Spring Arbor University logo has been thoughtfully and purposefully designed to reflect the integrity of our institution and the values we hold dear. Hearkening back to (and similar to) one of our most beloved campus landmarks, The Concept sculpture that was created by alumnus James J. Snyder Sr. ‘73, the logo also draws inspiration from The Concept and the Wesleyan Quadrilateral. It features a cross enveloped by four quadrants that represent both scripture, reason, tradition and experience, and also the four pieces of the Core experience.

Logo

When we use this logo, we should take care to use it consistently and appropriately. For clean and uniform presentation, we use standards to protect the space around our logo, wordmark and logomark.

Clear Space

For clean and uniform presentation, we use standards to protect the space around our logo, wordmark and logomark. As depicted here, the logo itself is used to determine the amount of breathing room that should be given to the logomark.

Brand Mark Usage

Incorrect Usage

The only accepted versions of the mark are the above approved lockups. Outside of approved scaling, the mark should never be altered. This includes proportions, lockup, and all other manipulations or modifications.

Colors

Colors can do more than just look pretty: they affect our mood, our understanding, how we process information and how we navigate a page. Use of our primary institutional colors reinforces the Spring Arbor brand. We have also developed a secondary color palette to be used when we want more latitude in communicating with specific audiences. For access to our color palettes, and the audiences for whom each is most appropriate, just send us a message here.

Primary Colors

Secondary Colors

Typography

Primary Font

The font “Flashlight” will used as the hero accent font.

Secondary Fonts

Proxima Nova will be used for headings and navigational elements.

Opens Sans will be used for all body copy.

Graphic Elements

Using our graphic elements wisely.

Spring Arbor University’s new graphic elements are sweeping arcs based off of expanded circular shapes and letters from the brand font “Flashlight.” These elements create SAU’s visual identity for the “Let Your Light Shine” campaign and should be used within the set guidelines listed below.

Shapes

Spring Arbor University’s graphic shapes are used to carry the look of the script font “Flashlight” throughout the brand. Sweeping arcsof the letters can be used, but must always remain abstract and should not be able to be read as an actual letter.

Dominant Shapes:

Navy blue, yellow, or image shapes that take up a large portion of the page.

Accent Shapes:

Can be layered over dominant shapes in subtle ways to add interest.

Background Shapes:

Light blue or gray shapes that are layered behind type and images. Cannot be layered with dominant or accent shapes.

Graphic Elements: Do’s and Dont’s

Dominant shapes are navy blue or yellow shapes that take up a large portion of the page.

Accent shapes can be layered over dominant shapes in subtle ways as seen below – but can only be light blue or gray.

Background shapes can only be light blue or gray and can be layered behind type and images, but not dominant or accent shapes.

Create perfectly smooth shapes.
Shapes should always go off the edge (bleed) of the print or web page.
Do not use dominant shapes next to each other.

Graphic elements can be used as a frame for photography.

Photography

Guidance on Using Photography

Photography plays a powerful role in creating and maintaining the Spring Arbor University visual identity. Our photography should be inspirational, inviting, and invoke a sense of community.Each image should capture the light our community shares with the world. Lens flares are encouraged to achieve this effect.

Lifestyle Photos

Photos should emit warmth, light, and sense of community. Warm tones and light flares are encouraged.

Textural/Closeup Shots

Warm glows are encouraged to give an ethereal feel to the photos. These can be used as secondary photos, either paired with other hero shots or used alone to add texture to a design.

Campus Shots

Expansive shots that feel ethereal with sun flares and light reflections. Lens flares may be added in post-production as long as they appear authentic.

Creative Examples